lost interest in solids - another update pg 2

Sleepless nights. Breastfeeding vs Bottle. Baby's first milestones. Vaccinations. Teething. Crawling.

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Postby BeccaM » Tue Aug 30, 2011 12:32 pm

I guess what I would do is keep the formula the same, but try introducing more high cal foods, like meats, full fat yogurt and cheese (my LO loves cheddar cheese and cottage cheese and homemade whole milk yogurt). That should help put some weight on him.
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Postby j_libs » Tue Aug 30, 2011 1:41 pm

Thanks for all the ideas!

I've tried a lot of foods the past week - turkey sausage, chicken tortellini, mac and cheese, eggs mixed with breadcrumbs and a little cheese and fried in butter, 2 different kinds of string cheese, sweet potato fries, breaded & fried string beans, sticky rice, whole milk yogurt, ice cream. All this stuff he'll take a bite or two then just play with it, squeeze it in his hand and eventually throw it on the floor.

I'm starting to think the doctor might be on to something when he said "maybe he has a texture issue" because DS really only eats crunchy things. The only solids he eats any decent amount of are puffs, cheddar crackers, graham crackers, and tortilla chips. He's even eating less of the finger fruits he used to like. I've stopped giving him puffs because the other crackers have more calories.

Not sure what I should do besides keep trying. He's not skin and bones thin or anything, he just has little body fat. Maybe I should call the doctor in a month if he's still not taking solids?

For his next meal I think I'll try melting some cheese on tortilla chips. If anyone can think of how I could make nutritious, high-calorie crackers let me know lol.
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Postby macleesy » Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:44 am

maybe try some dips with the crackers/chips - avocado, hummus, sour cream?
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Postby j_libs » Wed Aug 31, 2011 5:54 am

I have to laugh because never in a million years did I think I would be feeding my baby nachos and chips and dip!

Thanks for the ideas I'm going to just keep trying stuff! Hopefully he gets some teeth soon - maybe that will help.
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Postby Nikkijames » Fri Sep 02, 2011 8:45 pm

Most likely, if he's taking that much formula, he's just a small kid. I have to agree with Megan here. I have 4 kids and 1 wouldn't take solids AT ALL till 8 months. My 7.5 month is breastfed and not given any solids till 6 months. We've been experimenting with solids the past 6 weeks but being as I want the majority of his calories to come from breastmilk the entire first year, I really limit what I give him. Like he eats 1-2 meals of 2-3 tbs of fruit or veggies. I don't know how many ounces he takes because we don't so bottles at all, but he is 20 lbs! My older two children were the opposite- tiny! It would not have mattered what I fed them, they were not genetically dispositioned to be big. They're STILL small at 7 and 8 years old. I think it's fine if you want to add fat to his diet in the form of added butter, avocado, what have you. But if you start worrying that he has issues with texture (pretty hard to determine at his age, especially because he's a late teether), or trying to cajole him to eat more than he wants you could create unnecessary issues with food. Formula is higher in cals than solids generally, anyway...
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Postby j_libs » Mon Oct 03, 2011 8:59 pm

So today in my pediatrics lecture (i'm in nursing school right now) I learned WHY the doctor wants him to drink less formula and get more calories from solids:

When babies switch from formula to whole milk around 1 year (the usual recommended age), it's common for them to develop an iron deficiency and possibly anemia from that. Formula has iron added to it, milk doesn't. In addition milk inhibits the absorption of iron. So it's important for babies to be getting most of their calories from real food and not liquids by this age. Usually parents can't wait to switch from formula to milk because of the high cost of formula. And although I know a lot of mommas here breastfeed past age 1, that's really not as common in the general population. By age 1 it's recommended that they drink about 12 to 24 ounces per day of formula and the rest of their nutrition should come from solids.

I wish the doctor would have just told me that. It makes sense and would have changed the way I approached this situation. I'm definitely going to mention it to them the next time we're at the pediatrician.

Just an FYI since no one (including me) really understood why the doctor would want a baby to start switching from consuming mostly formula to consuming mostly food.

ETA: and just in case you were wondering - DS is doing better with the solids. He finally got a few teeth and that seems to have helped a lot. I think he's gained some weight - when I look at pictures of him from a couple of months ago vs now he looks like he "filled out" quite a bit. We'll see what the doctor says next month :)
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Postby meg1492 » Tue Oct 04, 2011 9:51 am

First, R'Amen. :D

Now, it is true that SOME babies might become anemic, not all of them do. We are still nursing and DSs iron levels have been fine. I don't really see the relationship between getting calories from solids and iron in formula. Unless your ped was telling you your child was anemic and needed to be eating meat and other iron rich foods...there isn't really a connection that I can see. :S
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Postby j_libs » Tue Oct 04, 2011 10:59 am

meg1492 wrote:First, R'Amen. :D

Now, it is true that SOME babies might become anemic, not all of them do. We are still nursing and DSs iron levels have been fine. I don't really see the relationship between getting calories from solids and iron in formula. Unless your ped was telling you your child was anemic and needed to be eating meat and other iron rich foods...there isn't really a connection that I can see. :S


maybe I didn't explain it well....

The problem isn't with the formula...The problem is when they go off the formula and switch to whole milk. If, when they make the switch, they're still getting most of their nutrients from liquids, there will be a severe drop in iron consumption because milk isn't fortified with iron (but formula is) and milk blocks the body's ability to absorb iron. So babies who are still mostly drinking bottles can develop an iron deficiency when formula is stopped. That's why they want them on solids - cereals, meats, greens, beans etc all contain iron. They want to make sure there is another dietary source of iron because iron deficiencies are most common during periods of rapid growth (like infancy and adolescence). A baby creates iron stores during the 3rd trimester that last to about 6 months. If they are still breastfed past age 1, and are drinking breastmilk instead of whole milk, this doesn't really apply, because breastmilk contains an appropriate amount of iron.

My pediatrician didn't say anything about anemia. But at 6 months and again at 9 months they told me to reduce the formula and push more solids. They didn't tell me why... But this is the reason. They are concerned about the baby developing an iron deficiency down the line. Also, it's more difficult to introduce new foods and break the frequent bottle habit after age 1. So that's why they were telling me to get more high calorie solids in him, instead of just switching him to a high cal formula or just giving him more bottles. That's how my instructor (who is a pediatric nurse practitioner) explained it.

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Postby Nikkijames » Mon Oct 10, 2011 2:13 pm

I suppose I can see that if you are eager to get off formula at 1. I have found that my babies were pretty well set on solid food by 1 though. But my daughter was really close to one before she was truly eating a lot of solids. And I think there might be a connection with the teeth- she didn't have any teeth till 10 months. I'm glad he's gained some weight though.

But breastfed babies who are allowed to self- wean will generally still be getting 50% of their nutrition from breastmilk at a year. So maybe that's the perspective I'm coming from. I don't want my son to wean at year, and I know that babies who eat tons of solids don't nurse as much :dunno:
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