Quick Question

Discuss photography tips, cameras, and photo theme of the month ideas here!

Moderators: B Michaelson, southernbelle, jessm, 1daysoon, reapage, Honey Bunny, unaffected, maddy, TrebleLily

Quick Question

Postby ssgt_wifey_usmc » Mon Apr 05, 2010 7:46 am

i'm very curious, when you are holding your camera is it better to have it feel a little heavy or light when you go to do a shoot? which gives you a better control?
Last edited by ssgt_wifey_usmc on Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
~Carolyn (GRAND OPENING)
ImageImage

ImageImageImage
User avatar
ssgt_wifey_usmc
Angel
Angel
 
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:00 am
Location: Oceanside,California

Postby blue-eden » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:10 am

You mean the lens? A heavy lens? It depends on how steady you are and how fast your ss, I think.

My macro lens is a beast, and unless my ss is very high, I'm better off with a tripod.
Certified Lactation Educator and Breastfeeding Counselor
Mum to M, nursling 3-7-07 - 11-7-08 :hb: and Leo 4-13-09
User avatar
blue-eden
Girlfriend
Girlfriend
 
Posts: 20441
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 12:00 am
Location: In limbo, Canada

Postby ssgt_wifey_usmc » Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:31 am

both camera body + lens together :D . sorry i should've been more specific. i'm a real newbie to Photography well i've been playing with a point and shoot but i think i'm ready for a SLR.
~Carolyn (GRAND OPENING)
ImageImage

ImageImageImage
User avatar
ssgt_wifey_usmc
Angel
Angel
 
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:00 am
Location: Oceanside,California

Postby anxious-annie » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:53 pm

Here's my long diatribe after doing a lot of research for my first DSLR, seeing someone who got what consumer reports said was the "best" and who ended up hating it, and seeing someone who bought an expensive professional camera and doesn't know how to use it so can't get a photo larger than 4x6.

You should go with what feels good in your hand. Some people prefer Nikon over Canon because they like the ergonomics and weight, and vice-versa. Also, the feel of a camera can change within a brand from type of camera to camera. Generally the heavier cameras and lenses are made with metal parts instead of plastic and tend to last a bit longer (good lenses are also heaver because they have better glass inside...they will also cost a lot more). If it's your first DSLR you don't need to worry about getting anything crazy expensive or super-duper nice (i.e. a professional camera). Go to a couple of camera stores and try them out in your hands, see what feels best.

Also, you'll find that there are dozens of brands of cameras. Do a little research to find out what will work best for you and your budget. Most people fall into Nikon or Canon, but not all. Other brands may have less expensive accessories (and the camera may be less expensive too!) but they might not have the range products that the two main players (Nikon and Canon) have. Or they might have just what you need.

Decide what you want to use it for and figure out what will work best for that. There's no reason to get a big expensive camera if all you want are photos of the kids that are nicer than a Point and Shoot, but don't have to be "professional" quality. You don't need a gigantic zoom lens for taking pictures in the back yard or at the park but might if you are taking pictures of wildlife or sports, and a macro lens that's great for pictures of insects and flowers won't work for taking pictures of kids on the slide. Maybe you need a single zoom lens that's good for everything? For a lot of people the "kit lens" (the lens that comes with the camera) is all they'll ever need or want but many people want something better since the kit lens is usually not too great for serious photography. Don't let a sales guy talk you into buying something you don't need and don't know how to use so he can increase his commission.

If most of your experience is with a point-and-shoot go with a consumer-grade DSLR because if nothing else you can set it to "auto" and it will function like a p&s with a nicer lens.

Another good idea is to rent or borrow a DSLR for a couple of days (most actual camera stores will do this...not Best Buy) and see how you like it when you are actually using it. Then rent another one and see how you like THAT. Perhaps rent one while you take a class on Photography 101 so you can decide parts of it you do and don't like and what you are looking for in a camera.

Just my $0.02. Hope that helps!
anxious-annie
Girlfriend
Girlfriend
 
Posts: 939
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 12:00 am

Postby ssgt_wifey_usmc » Mon Apr 05, 2010 7:38 pm

thank you Annie i greatly appreciate it. I have held a Nikon D3000(the on i first wanted but a friend bought), I liked that its steady and being able to adjust features to my liking. I held the canon rebel and thought that one was to light for me. Now i'm vearing towards the Nikon D5000 i was talking with another photograher and he was saying best start is ones that are kits. i'm going to do more research for sure, i'll have to see if they do that here.
~Carolyn (GRAND OPENING)
ImageImage

ImageImageImage
User avatar
ssgt_wifey_usmc
Angel
Angel
 
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:00 am
Location: Oceanside,California

Postby anxious-annie » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:40 pm

I just did a quick google search on "Nikon D5000 vs Nikon D3000" which is what I always do when I'm comparing two pieces of equipment. Someone, somewhere has compared everything to everything else at some point LOL. This was the first website I came across that did a side-by-side comparison:

http://www.radiantlite.com/2009/12/nikon-d5000-vs-nikon-d3000.html

And don't forget quality refurbished cameras too. I got one from Cameta Camera (they have an ebay store...store, not auction) and it was awesome. Came working absolutely perfectly, was factory refurbished, had all the parts, and had a 1 year warranty...for half the price. Just make sure you get it from someone reputable.
anxious-annie
Girlfriend
Girlfriend
 
Posts: 939
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 12:00 am


Return to Photography / Shutter Bugs